By Subject, H-Z

Please click on the links below to expand the boxes and find out more information about what each subject area does to stretch and challenge students. 

Work experience and visiting speakers from a range of health and social care related fields.

  • Oxbridge activities coordinated by Victoria Keitel;
  • ‘Reformation Day’, is a day of activities centered around a study of the European Reformations which constitute a good percentage of topics on the Medieval and Early Modern A level course.  It involves some revision of materials already covered and some material that will help the learning of the topics to be covered after the Christmas break.  The day has been devised between the College and Dr Claire Kennan of Royal Holloway University, the director of the Citizens' Project Public History Programme alongside Dr Euan Rogers from the National Archives;
  • Focused day on the study of Rebellions against the Tudors alongside Dr Claire Kennan of Royal Holloway;
  • Students taking part in the Citizens’ Project creating Youtube videos for national consumption on topics covered throughout the course;
  • Comprehensive in-classroom lending library system allows students to extend their knowledge by borrowing books related to the topics studied on the course.
  • Oxbridge activities coordinated By Dave Brown;
  • Lessons from Auschwitz Project gives two students chance to engage in high level project on the Holocaust;
  • Italian Studies Extension project - supported by Royal Holloway and the University of Catania, around 20 students every year sign up for this two year extension project.  Over the two years students on the program have to complete 3 projects: curating a one day show at Tate Modern; completing the chosen area of study with our sister school students who are visiting from Sicily; and, in the second year, undertake a four day study exchange in Ragusa, Sicily;
  • Visiting lecturers from university professors every year - last year Professor Giuliana Pieri from Royal Holloway talked to the students about the Cult of Mussolini and Professor Glen O’Hara from Oxford Brookes talked to second year students about the History of the British Navy.
  • Online resource KnowITAllNinja provides presentations, videos and quizzes for the whole specification;
  • Creative consolidation tasks;
  • Topical news stories are gathered and shared by students to keep up to date with the ever changing world of IT;
  • Elaborate and Extend activities at the end of each topic to encourage deeper understanding;
  • Subject Representative project to provide more extension materials easily accessible on the Study Directory.
  • Pathways to Law two year scheme: this provides invaluable opportunities, for example; to attend law lectures at universities, participate in debates and mock trials with undergraduates, meet with judges, barristers and solicitors and legal work experience is guaranteed (Pathways normally look for students with a high GCSE profile);
  • LNAT workshops for students applying to certain Russell Group Universities;
  • National Bar Mock Trial competition: this offers a wonderful opportunity for students to prepare and present cases before a real judge in a real courtroom and although it is challenging in time, effort and content, students find it very rewarding;
  • Firms of solicitors, for example Allen and Overy and Kingsley Napley, offer a yearly competition for one or two internships (Students with a high GCSE profile are encouraged to enter);
  • Students are encouraged to apply to the local courts to shadow a judge or judge’s clerk;
  • Students have attended Law events at Oxford University, Cambridge University, Queen Mary University and University of Law;
  • Students are given the opportunity of joining the Hampshire Community Court.  This means that some of our students now sit as ‘judges’ and deal with real life cases which involve children from ages of 10 to 14 who have committed a criminal offence.  The students undergo significant training which enables them to decide what ‘punishment’ the offenders should receive;
  • Students are given the opportunity of entering a competition whereby they are able to skype the Justices of the Supreme Court and discuss legal points;
  • College trips to the courts are offered to second year students;
  • Students are encouraged to attend local court hearings and report back to the class with their observations;
  • Students are encouraged to prepare a report of any relevant work experience and present to the class;
  • Students are invited to enter essay competitions at certain universities throughout the year;
  • Students are able to attend a workshop provided by a legal department in a global firm, learning the varied roles of a company lawyer and what it is like to work for a large corporation;
  • Murder Mystery Day is an opportunity to participate as court personnel in a ‘trial’;
  • Students are encouraged to attend Police Service Open Days;
  • Students are encouraged to carry out voluntary work for quasi legal organisations such as the CAB and Victim Support Scheme;
  • Subscription to A Level Law Review (Student concession of £12);
  • Students are encouraged to join the College Law Society where they will participate in debates, moots, discuss complex points of law and attend lectures by visiting speakers;
  • Extension tasks at the end of each topic in booklets - for example, researching other similar cases to illustrate the legal principle and preparing an engaging presentation for the rest of class;
  • Students are asked to create their own problem scenarios and mark schemes for the rest of the class to answer;
  • Students are referred to certain legal websites for wider reading on topics of particular interest;
  • BTEC students are directed to textbooks and websites with lots of interesting information which goes beyond what is required in their coursework and the more able students are able to understand this material and put it into their own words to bolster their grade;
  • BTEC assignments are structured in such a way to enable students to achieve pass, merit or distinction - the more able students will be pushed to achieve distinctions, while less able students still feel supported and satisfied by achieving pass and merit criteria.
  • Further mathematics can be studied as a fourth course, either as an AS level in the first year or full A level.  We are proud to have one of the largest cohorts of further mathematicians anywhere in the country;
  • Maths Inspiration Trip - a trip to the Maths Inspiration Lectures which is a national programme of interactive maths lecture shows for teenagers (open to all first and second year maths students);
  • Senior Maths Challenge - the UKMT Individual Maths Challenges are lively, intriguing multiple choice question papers, which are designed to stimulate interest in maths in large numbers of pupils (open to all first and second year maths students, compulsory for further maths students);
  • External speakers from education and industry regularly come in to speak to students about the use of maths beyond A level (open to all maths students);
  • Paris Trip - students visit Paris and apply their maths in a range of activities (open to first year maths students);
  • Reading Maths - recreational mathematics books are read by classes who present what they have learned in class (for further maths students);
  • *STEP and Admission test preparation lessons - once per week in year 12, twice per week in year 13 and all day workshops in the summer of year 12 (open to all);
  • Support for BMAT candidates.
  • Stretch & challenge opportunities are routinely flagged using the icon on the right to draw students’ attention to additional reading, viewing, activities which will help them augment their knowledge and understanding;
  • Further/Extended reading tasks;
  • Preliminary reading tasks for theory;
  • Creative consolidation tasks;
  • Visits from industry practitioners to develop portfolio eg. focus groups for advertising campaigns
  • Working to real client briefs (eg. Fleet Film promotion/Fleet Film Festival, music video production, CMPP documentaries);
  • In-house production company (second years) led by Will Devereux.
  • University of Southampton trip to Audiology lab to look at new research in the area;
  • Visiting speakers from relevant fields;
  • Medical Mavericks day where professionals come on to demonstrate equipment used in the medical fields;
  • Extension questions on student directory going beyond the scope of the course;
  • Students are directed towards relevant MOOCS in the medical area;
  • Subscription to Biologist (back copies also available to lend);
  • New lending library;
  • Sites to watch on the bus - links to videos which extend knowledge in the area;
  • MedSoc.

Students have access to numerous academic and performance opportunities that go beyond the requirements of the course.

  • Academically, high ability students have access to original source readings, advanced harmonic exercises and comparative aural tasks that go beyond the expectations of the course and engage in undergraduate modes of thinking. The majority of regular tasks are differentiated three ways to allow for exploration and engagement beyond the confines of the syllabus. Additional Grade 6-8 Theory lessons are also offered to especially strong students, which are useful preparation for undergraduate-style harmonic classes;
  • Students have access to over 30 performance opportunities throughout the year that engage them beyond the practical confines of the course, many with professional musicians.  These include weekly lunchtime recitals with opportunities for feedback, eight large scale choral and instrumental ensemble concerts, external solo and chamber music concerts, fully-staged operatic performances and masterclasses with internationally renowned musicians; this year with the saxophone phenomenon Jess Gillam.  All students engage with this music-making, allowing for musical growth and development, giving them access to music-making venues such as Guildford Cathedral, Westminster Abbey and The Royal Memorial Chapel Sandhurst;
  • Students have the opportunity to engage in local community volunteer and work experience activities, including for local festivals in Aldershot and Fleet and music therapy with the InHarmony group;
  • Students have access to a number of tours involving performing, recording and educational workshops in a variety of internationally renowned festivals and venues; this year to France, Poland and Russia respectively.
  • The high achievers in the second year are invited to become subject mentors - they are encouraged to run 1-2-1 workshops with students who are struggling with any aspect of the course (this is normally mainly for 1st years but also any 2nd year students who may need some extra contact time);
  • Students are encouraged to attend trips organised by the department such as Abbey Road Studios;
  • There are opportunities for music technology students to perform in and around the College, with regular live lunches and events in the Prospect Theatre;
  • Coursework is designed to stretch the students within assignments;
  • SixFest is an event which is organised by students, auditioning and choosing the bands to perform on the night as well as deciding on the price for the tickets and promoting the event;
  • Although it is not a requirement of the course, students are encouraged to use musictheory.net to develop their understanding of music theory - particularly those students who wish to take a university music course;
  • Special focus groups, designed to analyse exam briefs and share good practice.
  • The high achievers in the second year are invited to become subject mentors - they are encouraged to run 1-2-1 workshops with students who are struggling with any aspect of the course (this is normally mainly for 1st years but also any 2nd year students who may need some extra contact time);
  • On the BTEC course, this can also involve joining in with band sessions and being an extra support in the band as well as running extra tutorials on the written side of the course (including the use of Logic Pro X);
  • Students are encouraged to attend trips organised by the department such as Abbey Road Studios and BBC Introducing Live;
  • BBC Introducing Live will give all BTEC Music students an insight into every aspect of the Music Industry from performing in a band to working for PRS;
  • There are opportunities for BTEC students to perform in and around the College, with regular live lunches and events in the Prospect Theatre;
  • Coursework is designed to stretch the students within assignments - for example in BTEC Music Performance, students are encouraged to perform tracks that are one or two grades above their usual grade;
  • SixFest is an event which is organised by students, auditioning and choosing the bands to perform on the night as well as deciding on the price for the tickets and promoting the event;
  • Although it is not a requirement of the course, students are encouraged to use musictheory.net to develop their understanding of music theory - particularly those students who wish to take a university music course;
  • Special focus groups, designed to analyse exam briefs and share good practice.
  • Students have access to numerous performance opportunities, practical workshops and professional performances both in and out of College that go beyond the requirements of the course;
  • Further reading and tasks are set beyond assessment criteria to allow breadth of knowledge and skills;
  • Choreographic and devising units are lead by students in order for them to use their extended knowledge and skills for best practice;
  • Progression advice knowledge and skills are embedded into the delivery of the course;
  • Advertise local opportunities to get involved in performance work;
  • Creative work in groups are differentiated by skill level so high achievers can fully explore their range of skills;
  • Regular teacher feedback helps stretch the ideas and skill level.
  • For all topics we teach, students have access to extension readings and links which are indicated within the work packs that students use (students can use time in lessons to look at these if they finish other tasks earlier than most);
  • There is an 'extension' page on the Philosophy Study Directory where students can find links to relevant websites, videos, online encyclopedias etc.
  • There is a student run 'Philosophy Society' that runs weekly at lunchtime, where they discuss both questions/theories related to course topics and also topics that are not covered by the A level specification;
  • In liaison with other departments, we hold panel debates (this year it will be on questions relating to the relationship between science and religion);
  • We run trips to ‘local’ universities (such as Southampton University) where they host days for A level students involving lectures, seminars and generally give students a feel for what studying philosophy at university is like.
  • Promoting competitions;
  • Inviting photography degree course leaders to talk to our students;
  • Inviting industry specialists to talk to students;
  • Promoting exhibitions;
  • Student Trip to exhibition;
  • Staff run additional workshops track students progress;
  • Celebrating students work by private view and exhibition of their work;
  • Work experience with external companies.

Students are working on their personal projects that they have decided on the theme.  Driven by finding their own research artists and one to one tutorials with the subject tutor, technical and conceptual challenges are part of the progression and developmental process of their projects.  This can range from using professional studio lighting equipment to exploring traditional film processing and printing to challenging scenarios in managing exposures with the camera.

  • Every students has an account for EverLearner, which has hundreds of tutorial videos for each topic and checkpoint tasks and practice questions;
  • PE Review magazine, articles are copied and upload to google sites for extended/additional reading;
  • Careers in Sport Exhibition is attended at SSP or done in house;
  • Solent University High Performance and Talented Athlete Scholarship advice;
  • Body worlds trips;
  • Exam technique workshops.
  • Engineering Society and Physics Society;
  • Extension questions provided for private study every lesson;
  • PAT* students - organised time slot to work on questions together;
  • BMAT preparation - three lunchtime sessions;
  • Additional harder questions provided in labs;
  • Physics club and engineering club (run by students).
  • New lending library;
  • Euroscola trip;
  • Trip to Parliament;
  • Politics society;
  • Extended reading assignments;
  • 1-2-1s for students to work on areas of interest;
  • Recommended podcasts on Brexit, UK politics and international relations (including Cambridge Politics Society);
  • Comprehensive and extended video archive;
  • Departmental Massolit achieve;
  • MP speaking events allow the students to quiz our elected representatives;
  • Dr Clare Woodford visiting the College to discuss democracy with reference to post68 political theory;
  • MUN event provides an excellent opportunity to truly understand the soft skills of diplomacy and debate;
  • Students are directed towards relevant MOOCS (last year RHUL ran one on the female rights movement);
  • Students have been directed towards the UCL Young Leaders Award;
  • 1-2-1 meetings with students applying to Oxbridge;
  • Students were supported by the department to produce a film on the Brexit referendum which involved numerous emails and time editing    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8Rb6WZvFqY;
  • Opportunities for students: one student won a prestigious opportunity to spend five days in Brussels with Liberal Democrat Catherine Bearder which included meeting senior diplomats, attending press round tables and meeting a number of MEPS.
  • Extra Reading [of Psychology-related novels, biographies, and academic books] - document on the Study Directory;
  • Extra Viewing [of Psychology-related films] - document on the Study Directory;
  • Lots of trips laid on (e.g. for 2018-2019, RHUL twilight lectures; 2-day Psychology conference and mock trial at the Royal Courts of Justice in London; Rain Man theatre trip (Woking); Psychology conference in Disneyland, Paris; Behind Bars conference; Poland/Auschwitz conference);
  • Week-long ‘Psychology Week’ in November with lots of outside speakers from local universities and from industry, as well as opportunities for students to take part in current research;
  • Additional opportunities to take part in University-level psychological research - on an ad hoc basis;
  • Psychology Review magazine - available to students (via the College Shop) at a subsidised rate;
  • Encouragement to explore Psychology-related MOOCs.
  • Sociology Review - College Shop subscriptions promoted and in Student Workroom - Activities embedded within booklets, students encouraged to utilise articles within essays;
  • Sociology E-mentor/Mentor programme - 2nd Year students who are working above target grade supporting 1st year students via email and in workshops;
  • A range of workshops and revision sessions - focusing on pushing to work above T25 grade;
  • Meaningful extension work set in all lessons - current focus for department Learner Walks;
  • Summer Homework Competition - students creating additional work (poster, painting, written work, book review, letter to author etc) - Prizes for ‘Academic Excellence’, ‘Innovation Award’ and ‘Endeavor Award’ which can be added to UCAS statements;
  • Peer marking activities - students engaging with higher level analysis and evaluation skills;
  • Sociology Film club at lunchtimes - run by student reps and to preview films that relate to topics being covered in lessons;
  • Differentiated group work within lessons - focusing on essay/exam practice;
  • Research tasks - additional research about current affairs that contextualise topics being covered within lessons;
  • Hosting a range of external speakers (additional work set to complement this) - this year we are interested in holding a ‘Crime Day’ whilst teaching crime and deviance;
  • All Sociology trips have worksheets/books with higher level reading/articles e.g. New York workbook has articles about issues surrounding Islamophobia after 9/11 and The Power of Advertising following visit to Times Square, competition for completed booklets and students encouraged to write an essay with their experiences from the trip;
  • Additional booklet being created - exam questions and plans to complete;
  • Consolidation/revision posters on topics and sociological studies covered - again prizes/commendations for most informative accounts etc.
  • Students are encouraged, with commendations, to do extracurricular activities from their individual 'Independent Study Log' in G-classroom, where they have nine options linked to the skills and course content.  For Year 12 it is compulsory to complete two/three per half term.  Many of the activities are based around newspapers’ coverage of socio-political development in the Spanish speaking world;
  • A literary workshop will be opened from November until May on Wednesdays period 5 to discuss literary and cinematics works and write essays;
  • Students receive a reading and film list in Year 1 and 2 as part of the extra curricular activities.  The titles and authors provide an extension to the course content, political, literary and social;
  • All the themed booklets contain a section with linked extra work to be completed during lessons by the more able and faster students;
  • All texts in the themed booklets used to develop translation skills into Spanish and English are longer than required, to provide a challenge to the most academic linguists while still allowing other students to work at different pace, and still covering the board requirements; 
  • Volunteering to teach Spanish at Ravenscote Primary School;
  • The Ferrari and Paella year long competition for Year 1 & 2 respectively, where students gather points for best weekly memory and grammar tests and group work.
  • Careers in Sport Exhibition is attended at SSP or done in house;
  • External speakers on Sport Psychology, Nutrition or Coaches to observe;
  • Solent University High Performance and Talented Athlete Scholarship advice;
  • Body worlds trips.